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Common Technology Myths Debunked

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Common Technology Myths Debunked

We eat, sleep and drink technology every day or at least bear some sort of relation with its by-products. That being said, a lot of our perceptions are based out of tales, myths & false propaganda, often derived by marketing kerfuffle that we consider to be true. Let’s take look at the most prevalent myths that we come across every day.

1. The Megapixel Myth – the more the better

Smartphone and camera manufacturers will have you believe that the more megapixels your camera have, the better. On the other hand, there are people who say that megapixels have nothing at all to do with image quality. Well, the truth lies somewhere in between. Surely, megapixels do play a role in overall camera and sensor quality. However, the role megapixels play isn’t as important as you’d think. It’s a myth.

Well, the truth lies somewhere in between. Surely, megapixels do play a role in overall camera and sensor quality. However, the role megapixels play isn’t as important as you’d think. It’s a myth.

Megapixels determine the potential detail a camera sensor can capture. The amount of detail, however, also depends on a multitude of other factors such as the lens, your camera settings, so on and so forth. This means that the more megapixels the camera has, the more potential the camera has, of capturing more detail.

Megapixels only become a factor when enlarging an image, or while cropping. More megapixels mean that the details within the image will be visible even on enlarging the image. It also means that an image with a higher MP count can be cropped to high or extreme levels and still have a lot of detail.

What matters, therefore, is the usage scenario. Basically, if you’re just an average smartphone camera user who takes the occasional photo, or you’re a bit of a shutterbug and use a generic point and shoot, megapixels will not matter much to you. Professionals, however, consider other aspects of the camera to determine image quality; such as sensor size, low light performance, frames per second, available lenses, dynamic range, etc.

Most cameras have more than enough megapixels for any sort of usage, and these other factors are going to play a bigger role in determining which camera is better suited to you.

If you’re a fashion photographer who needs to take head to toe portraits, megapixel count comes into play as it enables you to enlarge the image or crop it to extreme levels, and focus on individual aspects of the image for advertising posters, etc. In this case, more megapixels can save your time as it lets you modify the same image for different uses without sacrificing its details.

2) Macs are virus proof

Another one of the many Mac myths. The reality is, Macs DO get viruses. Most people are led to believe that Macs are virus proof. This myth was spread out of two factors:

1. The Mac OS is structurally and architecturally different from Windows, the file system is different and there is no common registry as is the case with Windows. Thus, viruses that affect Windows computers won’t affect Macs.

2. There are far fewer Macs than there are Windows based PCs.

These two factors combined with some great marketing by Apple, led many to believe that Macs are indeed virus proof. But that isn’t the case. It’s true that hackers generally like to go for the largest body count possible, and since PCs outnumber Macs, there are more viruses for PC systems than there are Mac viruses.

Why Apple systems are attacked less?

There are quite a few viruses for the Mac OS. The first ever reported virus for Mac was back in 1982. Created by 15-year-old Rich Skrenta, Elk Cloner was the first ever virus to go wild. It affected the Apple 2 computer, and it was a boot sector virus that affected the

It’s true that hackers generally like to go for the largest body count possible, and since PCs outnumber Macs, there are more viruses for PC systems than there are Mac viruses. However, there are quite a few viruses for the Mac OS.

Reported virus attacks on Apple

The first ever reported virus for Mac was back in 1982. Created by 15-year-old Rich Skrenta, Elk Cloner was the first ever virus to go wild. It affected the Apple 2 computer, and it was a boot sector virus that affected the Apple 2 systems via floppy disk and resulted in a short poem showing up every 50th boot. Ain’t that funny!

Since then, there have been the INIT-29-B virus, HyperCard HC-9507, Hong Kong virus, OSX/Leap-A, OSX.Macarena, the trojan horse AppleScript.THT, OSX.Lamzev.A and OSX.TrojanKit.Malez trojans, OSX.RSPlug.D trojan, OSX.Iservice and OSX.Iservice.B trojans, OSX/HellRTS trojan, and also the most recent FLASHBACK that affected 600,000 machines and the “pintsized” Trojan which basically allowed unhindered access to infected machines armed with basic, inbound only firewalls.

3) LED and LCD are different Screen Technologies

Although the acronyms are different, LED TVs are just different types of LCD TVs. The precise name would be “LED-backlit LCD TV,” but that’s too confusing for normal people and for everyday use, so they’re just called LED TVs.

The difference in the two is in terms of backlighting. Ordinary LCD TV’s use cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFL’s) to provide backlighting, whereas LED TV’s use an array of smaller, more efficient light emitting diodes (LED’s) to illuminate the screen, which gives them a few advantages.

4) Deleting files makes them disappear permanently

When files are deleted, what happens is they are actually only removed from an index, known in some cases, as a file allocation table. The data is still there. Unless those sectors or memory locations are overwritten with new data, the files will still be there.

Therefore, there are ways of recovering these deleted files, and unless you overwrite the memory locations, they can be recovered.

5) More signal bars = better service


The network bars on your phone actually indicate the signal strength of the mobile tower closest to you. The service you get depends upon how many people the mobile tower is serving at any given time.

Although the mobile towers are equipped to handle multiple users in any given location in a densely popular area, in certain situations like expos or concerts or festivals, etc, the population in the area of any given mobile tower may exceed the upper limit of the number of people it can handle.

Thus, although you may see bars on your phone, but you won’t get service because too many people are trying to get services from the same tower.

We hope you enjoyed reading one of our Myth Buster series and would love to know some more. Please comment with the next topic that you would like us to explore & explain to you. If our readers react to it with positive feedbacks then we would be more than happy to clear the smoke for you.

In the meantime if your phone/ laptop has been compromised due to its age, virus or some other damage, and you’re looking for an upgrade, then do consider selling it on Cashify with our assured sale within 48 hours.

Download the Cashify app now to find the value of your used phone, for either of Android or iOs devices.

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